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Long Way From Chicago: Home

A Long Way from Chicago

Sequel

Richard Peck

"I read because one life isn't enough, and in the page of a book I can be anybody;
I read because the words that build the story become mine, to build my life;
I read not for happy endings but for new beginnings; I'm just beginning myself, and I wouldn't mind a map;
I read because I have friends who don't, and young though they are, they're beginning to run out of material;
I read because every journey begins at the library, and it's time for me to start packing;
I read because one of these days I'm going to get out of this town, and I'm going to go everywhere and meet everybody, and I want to be ready."

Research Guidelines

Background Research on A Long Way from Chicago

Essential Question: Is conflict always bad? How does the historical period of A Long Way from Chicago relate to us today? How are Grandma’s lessons, themes from the novel, still applicable to people today?

Topics:

1.    Gangs in the early 1900s (Al Capone, Bugs Moran)

2.    The Great Depression (Black Tuesday, jobs, stock market, banks)

3.    Herbert Hoover/Hoovervilles

4.    Franklin D. Roosevelt/The New Deal

5.    Transportation of the 1900s (Biplanes/Railroad travel/Ford’s first cars, Hupmobile)

 

Responsibilities:

·         As a group, you will research and present on your assigned topic.

·         Each member of the group should write their own, specific research question.

·         Each member needs to find two reliable resources.

·         As a group, you will create a Google Slide presentation.

o   Explain the answer to your research question

o   Cite the evidence you found

o   Compare and Contrast how the historical period connects to our lives today

·         Each member is responsible for creating and presenting at least 2 slide(s) on their part of the topic.

Timeline:

Grading:

·         AOL Grade – The majority of your grade will be based on your independent work. A small portion will be a combined grade based on your group presentation.

4. The Day of Judgment 1932

Franklin D. Roosevelt & The New Deal

 Franklin D. Roosevelt, 1938
"The country needs and, unless I mistake its temper, the country demands bold, persistent experimentation. It is common sense to take a method and try it: If it fails, admit it frankly and try another. But above all, try something."

Credit

Thanks to Vanessa Loffredo from Overland Trail Middle School for sharing her libguide